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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Charles Bolden announced Tuesday changes to his senior leadership team. Associate Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate . Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Announces Winners of 2011 George M. Low Award for Quality

RELEASE : 12-058 NASA of 2011 M. Low for WASHINGTON — NASA has presented its premier honor for and performance, the M. Low Award, to two companies that share a commitment to teamwork, technical and managerial excellence, safety, and customer service.

The Low award demonstrates the agency’s commitment to promote excellence and continual improvement by challenging NASA’s contractor community to be a global benchmark of quality management practices.

The 2011 awards were presented Feb. 23 at NASA’s ninth annual Project Management Challenge in Orlando, Fla., to:

— Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. of Huntsville, Ala. Teledyne Brown Engineering provides space systems engineering, exploration, science, operations and maintenance, and manufacturing services to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center; and payload and cargo integration for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. This is the second time in the past five years that Teledyne Brown Engineering has received the award in the large business service category.

— Sierra Lobo, Inc. of Milan, Ohio. Sierra Lobo develops critical systems and technologies, and provides research support services associated with aeronautics and space exploration at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland; Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.; Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.; Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.; and Johnson Space Center in Houston. Sierra Lobo, also a two-time winner, received the award in the small business service category. It previously received the award in 2007.

The award was established in 1985 as NASA’s Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity. It was renamed in 1990 in memory of George M. Low, an outstanding leader with a strong commitment to quality products and workforce during his 27-year tenure at the agency. Low was NASA’s deputy from 1969 to 1976 and a leader in the early development of space programs.

For more information about the George M. Low Award, visit:

www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/gml
For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov
– end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Announces Winners of 2011 George M. Low Award for Quality

RELEASE : 12-058 NASA of 2011 M. Low for WASHINGTON — NASA has presented its premier honor for and performance, the George M. Low Award, to two companies that share a commitment to teamwork, technical and managerial excellence, safety, and customer service.

The Low award demonstrates the agency’s commitment to promote excellence and continual improvement by challenging NASA’s contractor community to be a global benchmark of quality management practices.

The 2011 awards were presented Feb. 23 at NASA’s ninth annual Project Management Challenge in Orlando, Fla., to:

— Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. of Huntsville, Ala. Teledyne Brown Engineering provides space systems engineering, exploration, science, operations and maintenance, and manufacturing services to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center; and payload and cargo integration for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. This is the second time in the past five years that Teledyne Brown Engineering has received the award in the large business service category.

— Sierra Lobo, Inc. of Milan, Ohio. Sierra Lobo develops critical systems and technologies, and provides research support services associated with aeronautics and space exploration at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland; Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.; Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.; Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.; and Johnson Space Center in Houston. Sierra Lobo, also a two-time winner, received the award in the small business service category. It previously received the award in 2007.

The award was established in 1985 as NASA’s Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity. It was renamed in 1990 in memory of George M. Low, an outstanding leader with a strong commitment to quality products and workforce during his 27-year tenure at the agency. Low was NASA’s deputy from 1969 to 1976 and a leader in the early development of space programs.

For more information about the George M. Low Award, visit:

www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/gml
For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov
– end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Announces Winners of 2011 George M. Low Award for Quality

RELEASE : 12-058 NASA of 2011 M. Low for WASHINGTON — NASA has presented its premier honor for and performance, the M. Low Award, to two companies that share a commitment to teamwork, technical and managerial excellence, safety, and customer service.

The Low award demonstrates the agency’s commitment to promote excellence and continual improvement by challenging NASA’s contractor community to be a global benchmark of quality management practices.

The 2011 awards were presented Feb. 23 at NASA’s ninth annual Project Management Challenge in Orlando, Fla., to:

— Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. of Huntsville, Ala. Teledyne Brown Engineering provides space systems engineering, exploration, science, operations and maintenance, and manufacturing services to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center; and payload and cargo integration for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. This is the second time in the past five years that Teledyne Brown Engineering has received the award in the large business service category.

— Sierra Lobo, Inc. of Milan, Ohio. Sierra Lobo develops critical systems and technologies, and provides research support services associated with aeronautics and space exploration at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland; Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.; Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.; Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.; and Johnson Space Center in Houston. Sierra Lobo, also a two-time winner, received the award in the small business service category. It previously received the award in 2007.

The award was established in 1985 as NASA’s Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity. It was renamed in 1990 in memory of George M. Low, an outstanding leader with a strong commitment to quality products and workforce during his 27-year tenure at the agency. Low was NASA’s deputy from 1969 to 1976 and a leader in the early development of space programs.

For more information about the George M. Low Award, visit:

www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/gml
For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov
– end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Announces Time Change For Shuttle Tile Presentation To School

Ann Marie Trotta
Headquarters, Washington                                        
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-034 NASA Time For Tile To WASHINGTON — The time for a Feb. 27 appearance by former space shuttle astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate for education, at Bruce Monroe Elementary School at Parkview in Washington, has changed. Melvin will present a space shuttle tile to the school and speak to students at 10 a.m. The event previously was scheduled for 1:30 p.m.

The deadline for reporters to arrange to cover the event also has changed. Media should contact Ann Marie Trotta at 202-358-1601 or ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov by 4 p.m. Feb. 24. The school is located at 3650 Warder Street NW in Washington.

Melvin will share with the students his experiences as a crew member aboard the space shuttle Atlantis on two missions, STS-122 in 2008 and STS-129 in 2009. He also will discuss NASA careers, including how to become an astronaut, and the opportunities available to students who pursue science, technology, engineering and math studies.

To learn more about NASA education, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

– end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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