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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s , Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities during this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s chief engineer. As chief engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending a blank e-mail message to hqnews-subscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov. To unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a blank e-mail message to hqnews-unsubscribe@mediaservices.nasa.gov.

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NASA Administrator Leads Action Session of President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness

MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-020 NASA of President’s on Jobs and WASHINGTON — NASA Charles Bolden will lead a discussion with business leaders and higher education professionals at a Listening and Action Session of the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. PST on Friday, Feb. 3, in Seattle.

Bolden will be joined by Darlene Miller, president and CEO of Permac Industries and a member of the President’s Council; Brad Smith, general counsel at Microsoft; John Vechey, founder and CEO of PopCap Games (Electronic Arts); Nicolas J. Hanauer, partner at Second Avenue Partners; and Don Graves, executive director of the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness.

The group will discuss how businesses and organizations like NASA can enhance educational opportunities in , , engineering and mathematics beyond the classroom to develop a competitive and innovative workforce. The council will meet as part of the Business Higher Education Forum taking place on Friday.

Members of the media wishing to attend the Listening and Action Session should contact Lauren Worley at 202-386-5406 or lauren.b.worley@nasa.gov.

For more information about the council, visit:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/advisory-boards/jobs-council
For information about the Business Higher Education Forum, visit: http://www.bhef.com – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Deputy Administrator Visits Aurora Flight Sciences Highlights Importance Of Technology In An American Economy Built To Last

Sarah Ramsey
Headquarters, Washington                                   
202-358-1694
sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-017 NASA Highlights Of Technology In An American To Last WASHINGTON — NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver will visit Aurora Flight Sciences in Manassas, Va., on Jan. 27 to highlight how government can partner with small business to help create the jobs of the future through investment in and technology.

NASA has partnered with Aurora on a number of projects involving innovative future aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle technology, and the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) satellite test bed. SPHERES provides an opportunity for high school students to design research for the International Space Station.

Garver’s visit comes three days after President Obama delivered his State of the Union speech, in which he talked about an American economy that is built to last.

Garver and Aurora CEO John Langford will be available to speak with news media representatives during a tour of the Aurora facility beginning at 11:20 a.m. EST. There also will be a photo opportunity as Garver participates in a ground-based demonstration of the Centaur Optionally Piloted Aircraft.

Media representatives wanting to attend the event must call Sarah Ramsey at 202-358-1694 or email her at sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov by 10:30 a.m. Friday morning to be badged into the facility. Journalist planning to attend must be U.S. citizens.

Founded in 1989, Aurora Flight Sciences designs and builds robotic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles for both scientific and military applications. Aurora is headquartered is in Manassas, Va., with production plants in Bridgeport, W.V., and Columbus, Miss., and a Research and Development Center based at MIT in Cambridge, Mass.

For more information about Aurora Flight Sciences, visit:

Home

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

– end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Visits Morgan State University; Highlights Importance of Science, Math in Creating Economy That Works for All

MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-015 NASA University
Highlights Importance of , Math in That for All WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden will visit Morgan State University in Baltimore on Jan. 25 to meet with students in the engineering and science programs, and highlight the importance of science, engineering and mathematics in and sustaining the economy. Bolden’s visit will come the day after President Obama delivers his State of the Union speech.

Bolden will visit the Richard N. Dixon Science Research Center School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural and the Clarence M. Mitchell, Jr. School of Engineering. Morgan State University is one of NASA’s University Research Centers, studying next generation aviation safety, aerospace systems engineering and Earth science.

While visiting the Engineering Visualization Research Laboratory, Bolden and Morgan State University President David Wilson will be available to speak with news media at 12:45 p.m. EDT.

Media representatives should call Sarah Ramsey at 202.358.1694 or email her at sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov to attend the tour and press event.

Founded in 1867, Morgan State University is one of the nation’s historically black colleges and universities. For more information about Morgan State University, visit:

http://www.morgan.edu

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov
– end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Administrator Speaks at MLK Commemorative Service

NASA Charles Bolden and delivers greetings from President Obama at the 44th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. on Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

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