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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA Changes WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday changes to his leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s engineer. As engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Co-Hosts Minority Males In STEM Symposium

Ann Marie Trotta
Headquarters, Washington                                        
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov

Paul F. Hassen
Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Washington
202-478-6073
phassen@aplu.org

MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-033 NASA Co- In STEM WASHINGTON — NASA’s Office of Education will join the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in hosting a Males in STEM Symposium on Feb. 28. The day-long program will focus on ways to increase participation in science, technology, and mathematics (STEM) fields for students from under-represented racial and ethnic groups.

U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) is the scheduled keynote speaker. Woodrow Whitlow, NASA’s associate for mission , and Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate for education, will participate along with Carl Wieman, associate director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Byron Pitts, a correspondent with CBS News.

Members of the media interested in attending the symposium should contact Ann Marie Trotta at 202-358-1601 or ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov by 3 p.m. EST Feb. 27. The will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. in NASA’s James E. Webb Memorial Auditorium located at 300 E Street S.W., in Washington. The morning portion of the will also be streamed live on NASA’s UStream channel.

Symposium participants will review data from efforts to adapt university-based programs for reducing under-representation and broadening local success at encouraging minority males’ participation in STEM.

NASA’s education programs emphasize engagement with under-served and under-represented population groups in order to create an inclusive and diverse workforce for the future.

To view streaming video from NASA, :

http://www.ustream.tv/nasahdtv

To learn more about NASA education, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

To learn more about the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, visit:

http://www.aplu.org

To learn more about the American Association for the Advancement of Science, visit:

http://www.aaas.org

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NASA Administrator Announces Senior Leadership Changes

RELEASE : 12-059 NASA Leadership WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced Tuesday to his senior leadership team. Associate Administrator Chris Scolese was named director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight in Greenbelt, Md., and Robert Lightfoot, director of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight in Huntsville, Ala., will serve as acting associate administrator. Both will assume their new responsibilities on March 5.

Scolese, who has been with NASA since 1987, succeeds Robert Strain, who announced his decision to return to private industry in January. Lightfoot joined NASA in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager at Marshall. Lightfoot’s deputy, Gene Goldman, will serve as Marshall’s acting center director.

“Both Chris and Robert are dedicated public servants who have a passion for NASA and exploration,” Bolden said. “We are fortunate to have such talented and experienced leaders who are capable of assuming these critical responsibilities this important time.”

As associate administrator, Lightfoot will be the agency’s highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA’s broad efforts in human space flight, science and aeronautics. At Goddard, Scolese will lead a major U.S. laboratory for developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft. Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation, astronomy and space physics missions. It was established in 1959 as NASA’s first space flight facility.

“I am excited with the depth and diversity of experiences Chris and Robert will bring to their new roles,” Bolden added. “I know the entire NASA family will wish them continued success as they begin these new challenges.”

Scolese served as the agency’s acting administrator in 2009 and was previously NASA’s engineer. As engineer, Scolese was responsible for ensuring that development efforts and mission operations within the agency were planned and conducted on a sound technical and management basis. He also served as deputy associate administrator in the Office of Space Science at Headquarters and previously served as deputy director of Goddard, Earth Orbiting Satellite program manager, and deputy director of flight programs and projects for Earth Science.

Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., and Headquarters. In 1998, Lightfoot was named deputy division chief of Marshall’s Propulsion Test Division. He joined Stennis in 1999 as chief of Propulsion Test Operations where he managed space shuttle main engine testing and multiple NASA, Department of Defense, and industry rocket engine test programs. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Both men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov  – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Hosts Events to Celebrate 50 Years of Americans in Orbit

MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-026 NASA Events to 50 of in Orbit CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — In celebration of 50 years of in orbit, NASA’s Kennedy in Florida will host several events Feb. 17 and 18 that will air live on NASA Television.

On Feb. 17 at 10 a.m. EST, NASA Charles Bolden and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana will host an employee presentation on NASA TV with the first two Americans to orbit Earth, Mercury astronauts John Glenn and Scott Carpenter. On Feb. 20, 1962, Glenn piloted his Friendship 7 spacecraft on the first U.S. orbital mission. Three months later, on May 24, Carpenter became the second American in orbit.

At 3 p.m., NASA TV will air a news conference with Glenn and Carpenter. The will take place at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in the Mercury Mission Control exhibit.

On Feb. 18 at 6:30 p.m., Glenn and Carpenter will participate in a ceremony at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex honoring all who made NASA’s Project Mercury possible. The “On the Shoulders of Giants” program will include remarks from Cabana, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) and astronaut Steve Robinson, who flew with Glenn on his second trip into orbit on Discovery’s STS-95 mission in 1998.

Media interested in covering the news conference and ceremony should contact Andrea Farmer at 321-449-4318 or John Kennedy at 321-449-4273 for access to the visitor complex.

Highlights from the Feb. 17 and 18 events will air on NASA TV’s Video File. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv
For information about the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, visit: http://www.kennedyspacecenter.com
For more information about NASA’s Project Mercury, visit: http://go.usa.gov/QIM
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Student Teams to Conduct Microgravity Experiments at Glenn Research Center

RELEASE : 12-067 to Conduct at Center CLEVELAND — NASA-selected student will test their science experiments in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland from March 15-20. While in free fall, the students’ experiments will experience microgravity conditions similar to those on the International Space Station.

The selections are part of two national science competitions: Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) for high school student teams and What If No Gravity? (WING) for student teams in fifth through eighth grades.

The four winning DIME teams will a stipend to a to Glenn to conduct their experiments, review the results with NASA personnel and tour Glenn’s facilities.

The teams selected for DIME are:
— Ransom Everglades High School, Miami, Fla.
— Neighborhood After School Science Association, Ava, N.Y.
— Licking Heights High School, Pataskala, Ohio
— St. Ursula Academy, Toledo, Ohio

On March 15 and 16, the Neighborhood After School Science Association and Licking Heights High School will operate their experiments. St. Ursula Academy and Ransom Everglades High School will conduct theirs on March 19 and 20.

Twenty-four WING teams were selected to build their experiments and ship them to Glenn for testing by NASA. The experiments and resulting data will be returned to the teams so they can analyze their performance and prepare reports about their findings.

The teams selected for WING are:
— Tuba City Boarding School, Tuba City, Ariz. (3 teams)
— Ellen Ochoa Learning Center, Cudahy, Calif. (2 teams)
— Warren G. Harding Middle School, Des Moines, Iowa
— Holy Rosary School, Duluth, Minn.
— Sleeping Giant Middle School, Livingston, Mont.
— Neighborhood After School Science Association, Ava, N.Y.
— Longfellow Middle School, Lorain, Ohio
— Menlo Park Academy, Cleveland, Ohio
— Independence Middle School, Bethel Park, Pa. (2 teams)
— Drums Elementary Middle School, Drums, Pa.
— Hazleton Area School District – Freeland Elementary Middle School, Freeland, Pa.
— Valley Elementary Middle School, Sugarloaf, Pa. (2 teams)
— St. Nicholas – St. Mary’s School, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
— Webb School of Knoxville, Knoxville, Tenn. (4 teams)
— Kenmore Middle School, Arlington, Va.
— Washington Irving Middle School, Springfield, Va.

DIME, WING and other educational programs help NASA attract and retain students in science, technology, and mathematics, or STEM. Having a skilled workforce in these disciplines is critical to future science, and space exploration programs.

The Teaching From Space Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston sponsors the DIME and WING competitions. The office manages educational opportunities that use the human spaceflight program and the unique environment of microgravity to inspire students.

For information about NASA’s DIME and WING student competitions, visit:

http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/DIME.html
For more information about NASA’s education programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For information about NASA’s Glenn Research Center, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/glenn – end – text-only version of this release

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NASA Announces Winners of 2011 George M. Low Award for Quality

RELEASE : 12-058 NASA Announces Winners of 2011 M. Low for Quality WASHINGTON — NASA has presented its premier honor for quality and performance, the M. Low Award, to two companies that share a commitment to teamwork, technical and managerial excellence, safety, and customer service.

The Low award demonstrates the agency’s commitment to promote excellence and continual improvement by challenging NASA’s contractor community to be a global benchmark of quality management practices.

The 2011 awards were presented Feb. 23 at NASA’s ninth annual Project Management Challenge in Orlando, Fla., to:

— Teledyne Brown , Inc. of Huntsville, Ala. Teledyne Brown provides space systems , exploration, science, operations and maintenance, and manufacturing services to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight ; and payload and cargo integration for NASA’s Johnson Space . This is the second time in the past five years that Teledyne Brown Engineering has received the award in the large business service category.

— Sierra Lobo, Inc. of Milan, Ohio. Sierra Lobo develops critical systems and technologies, and provides services associated with aeronautics and space exploration at NASA’s Glenn Center in Cleveland; Langley Center in Hampton, Va.; Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.; Ames Center in Mountain View, Calif.; and Johnson Space Center in Houston. Sierra Lobo, also a two-time winner, received the award in the small business service category. It previously received the award in 2007.

The award was established in 1985 as NASA’s Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity. It was renamed in 1990 in memory of George M. Low, an outstanding leader with a strong commitment to quality products and workforce his 27-year tenure at the agency. Low was NASA’s deputy from 1969 to 1976 and a leader in the early development of space programs.

For more information about the George M. Low Award, :

www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/gml
For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov
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NASA Contract Modification For Engineering And Support Services

Sonja Alexander                                   
202-358-1761
Headquarters, Washington
sonja.r.alexander@nasa.gov

Angela Storey
256-544-0034
Marshall Flight , Huntsville, Ala.
angela.d.storey@nasa.gov

RELEASE : C12-004 NASA For And HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — NASA has signed its final contract option with InfoPro Corp. in Huntsville to continue engineering technicians and trades services for the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

The $45.7 million contract modification includes $4.1 million for mission services and a potential maximum order quantity value of $41.6 million for additional support services that are available through orders under the indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity portion of the contract.

The contract covers a wide range of engineering technicians and other trade skills to perform testing, ground and space-based , test operations, data analysis, machine and electrical shop operations, and other technical activities.

The one-year contract option begins on March 1, 2012. The performance based, cost-plus--fee, mission services contract with an indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity portion has a potential mission services value of $56.9 million and a potential maximum order quantity value of $150.8 million, with the exercise of this final option period. The contract was originally awarded in March 2008.

For more information about NASA and agency programs, :

          http://www.nasa.gov

      – end – text-only version of this release

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D.C. SCHOOL TO RECEIVE NASA SPACE SHUTTLE TILE DURING BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENT MONDAY

Ann Marie Trotta
Headquarters, Washington                                        
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-032 D.C. School To NASA Tile During History WASHINGTON — Leland Melvin, NASA’s associate for education and a former space shuttle astronaut, will present a space shuttle tile to Bruce Monroe Elementary School at Parkview and speak to students on , Feb. 27.

Representatives of the media wanting to attend the event should contact Ann Marie Trotta at 202-358-1601 or ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov by 9 a.m. Feb. 27. The school is located at 3650 Warder Street NW in Washington. The event begins at 1:30 p.m. and is expected to last 90 minutes.

Melvin will share with the students his experiences as a crew member aboard the space shuttle Atlantis on two missions, STS-122 in 2008 and STS-129 in 2009. He also will discuss NASA careers, including how to become an astronaut, and the opportunities available to students who pursue science, technology, and math (STEM) studies.

NASA’s education programs employ the agency’s many missions to inspire learners of all ages. The space shuttle tile program is an example of how the agency uses its unique assets to engage audiences.

To learn how schools can apply to receive a space shuttle tile for STEM curricula, visit:

http://gsaxcess.gov/nasawel.htm

To learn more about NASA education, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

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NASA Announces Winners of 2011 George M. Low Award for Quality

RELEASE : 12-058 NASA Winners of 2011 M. Low Award for WASHINGTON — NASA has presented its premier honor for and performance, the M. Low Award, to two companies that share a commitment to teamwork, technical and managerial excellence, safety, and customer service.

The Low award demonstrates the agency’s commitment to promote excellence and continual improvement by challenging NASA’s contractor community to be a global benchmark of quality management practices.

The 2011 awards were presented Feb. 23 at NASA’s ninth annual Project Management Challenge in Orlando, Fla., to:

— Teledyne Brown , Inc. of Huntsville, Ala. Teledyne Brown provides space systems , exploration, science, operations and maintenance, and manufacturing services to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center; and payload and cargo integration for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. This is the second time in the past five years that Teledyne Brown has received the award in the large business service category.

— Sierra Lobo, Inc. of Milan, Ohio. Sierra Lobo develops critical systems and technologies, and provides services associated with aeronautics and space exploration at NASA’s Research Center in Cleveland; Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.; Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.; Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.; and Johnson Space Center in Houston. Sierra Lobo, also a two-time winner, received the award in the small business service category. It previously received the award in 2007.

The award was established in 1985 as NASA’s Excellence Award for Quality and Productivity. It was renamed in 1990 in memory of George M. Low, an outstanding leader with a strong commitment to quality products and workforce his 27-year tenure at the agency. Low was NASA’s deputy from 1969 to 1976 and a leader in the early development of space programs.

For more information about the George M. Low Award, visit:

www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/gml
For information about NASA and agency programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov
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NASA Chief Technologist to Visit Dayton’s CRG Wednesday

David E. Steitz
Headquarters, Washington     
202-358-1730/202-236-5829
david.steitz@nasa.gov
 
Kim Hewett, Marketing Team Leader
CRG, Dayton, Ohio
937-320-1877 ext. 1208/502-415-3012
hewettkk@crgrp.com
MEDIA ADVISORY : M12-031 NASA to Dayton’s CRG WASHINGTON — NASA Technologist Mason Peck will visit Cornerstone Group Inc. (CRG) in Dayton, Ohio on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 2 p.m. EST. Peck’s visit will highlight how government can partner with small business to help create the jobs of the future through investment in science and technology.

CRG has been the recipient of 18 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program contracts with NASA with a variety of different focuses, including projects such as creating inflatable structures for radio frequency antennas and, most recently, healable polymer matrix composites for future space vehicles.

One of its earlier SBIR contracts, with NASA’s Kennedy Space , led to the development of a new type of structural patch for a variety of consumer uses including Rubbn’Repair, for automotive uses; and Rec’Repair for the outdoors and adventure markets. Both are flexible, heat-activated structural patches.

Peck and CRG’s CEO and President Patrick Hood will be available to speak with reporters a tour of the CRG facility at 2750 Indian Ripple Rd., in Dayton, beginning at 2 p.m. There also will be a photo opportunity with Peck and Hood the tour.

Journalists wanting to attend the must call Kim Hewett at 937-320-1877, ext. 1208, or email her at hewettkk@crgrp.com by 3 p.m. Tuesday to be badged into the facility.

For more information about CRG, visit:

http://www.crgrp.com
For a biography of NASA Chief Technologist Mason Peck and information about his office, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/oct
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